Another Good Walk

The pool above Calder Vale, where Albert watched the boys ice skating
cc-by-sa/2.0 – © Ian Greiggeograph.org.uk/p/4940409

On the evening of Sunday January 11 1942, Albert starts his next letter, after a long walk in freezing weather. We know from previous letters that Albert was not averse to hitch hiking (see What an Adventure for a particularly fortuitous lift he received in November 1941). On 11th January Albert manages to hitch a lift further east, to explore Garstang and beyond. Albert furnishes us with timings as he details his route, a walk where he comes across a ruined castle, fearless skaters, tumbling rivers and frosty valley views. Finally, after about four hours of walking Albert catches another lift and rides back to Blackpool in style, in a Vauxhall 12.

Dear All,

I have just been for a good walk, though the weather was not so nice as it has been. All the week the weather has been cold, but the sun has shone most of the time: today it has been just cold or until about 4 o’clock, when the clouds and mist did part a little, and reveal a red and chilly sun.

I started off at 10.45 and took the ‘bus to Poulton, where the crossroads is. I walked along the railway and beyond the next cross roads (where the main Fleetwood road crosses the Lancaster one) before I got a car. There were few cars on the road, and two which did stop were not going my way. However, I did get a lift (11.50), in a car which the man was driving from St Annes to Glasgow, which he reckoned to reach about 5.30. I left him near Garstang, just beyond the railway bridge (12.10). I then went down to Garstang by the station and church, across the Wyre and left just over the bridge, before the church.

The lane took me up by the remains of a castle keep (more likely the remains of a look tower), and to a farm, where the road became a footpath which led over two railways, and became a road or lane once more (1.0). I followed this road and after some cross country walking and then back on the road again, reached a rather pretty place called Calder Vale.

Once again the road became a footpath, which led up from the village up the steep sides of the river valley, through a small wood, at the bottom of which the river rushed over rocks and boulders. It was quite similar to the Welsh scenery in some aspects. I came across a pond above the river, on which some boys were skating and cycling. I should think it has been quite cold there, though I felt warm enough all the time I was walking. The path gradually reached the top of the valley, at a small church and school (2.0). I ate my dinner (cheese sandwiches) there, but it was so chilly sitting still that I saved some cakes until later, and ate them walking along. I turned south at the church and kept to the road on the east side of the Calder valley, right down to Claughton park. The road was particulary nice where it runs closest to the river, which can be seen tumbling its way over the stones, and between the rocky walls which rise to 12 feet or so on either side. The grassy fields which formed the sides of the valley were white with frost, even when I was there. I came to the main railway and over a canal, which was also frozen over, but not so much as the pond. The canals must be fine for skating when they are frozen over. From there it was only a short walk to the corner at Churchtown (3.45). From there I got the first car which came along (a Vauxhall 12) and rode in state to Blackpool (4.10).

Albert’s lift home

Monday: By the way I believe I told you that I was to be on Guard over the weekend. Fortunately, I was not required after all and so could go on my walk. Today we have had some snow, though not yet enough to worry about. In spite of the snow though, I see the first spring flowers, jonquil and narcissus, in the shops, as well as some late chrysanthemums and some carnations. They are not priced of course.

Not having Guard to do enabled me to go to the Halle concert, which I enjoyed quite well, though there was none of my favourites in the programme. However, it was good. Tuesday there is a concert by the RAF orchestra, which I must attend, and on Thursday (or perhaps Friday) I must go to the cinema to see Walt Disney’s “Reluctant Dragon.”

I had a surprise the other night when I pulled out the watch and found its figures all a-glow and easily readable – it could not have been really dark when you looked at it. It was even more surprising since I had been carrying the watch in my pocket, and it had not been exposed to the light. It keeps very good time too.

Perhaps you could send up and Ever-Ready battery for my torch if they are procurable. I shall want a new one soon, and cannot get Ever-Ready ones up here, though there are plenty of unknown makes for sale, at about 9d each. I suppose the children will soon be leaving you, or have done so already. I hope thay have had a good time at home. Goodbye, and love to you all from Albert.

P.S. I ate two of your apples yesterday.

I wish I knew what type of watch Albert had, and also why he was not in posession of it previously. I’m happy to know he was pleased with it and doubtless he used his watch to make note of the time during his walk. Maybe one day I will retrace his steps, for Calder Vale appears, according to my research, essentially unchanged all these years later.

Once again I find myself smiling at the list of things Albert must do, e.g. attend concerts and go to the cinema. His ‘obligations’ shatter my illusion of the bleakness of wartime life! It’s good to read that there are always things to look forward to, even in the darkest of times.