Colouring My Mabey Family Past

An afternoon in 1937 comes back to life

The Mabey family at home, Branstone, Isle of Wight c.1937

When Val of Colouring The Past offered her followers a free colouring of a photograph, I jumped at the chance. Val selected this photograph of three generations of my Mother’s family, that first appeared in my post Your Dear Little Self, which I posted last August. I am so happy with the results! Val has done such a careful and sensitive restoration, these figures seem to glow with life. Val has meticulously followed the information I could give her about clothing, hair colour and the house and garden. I was able to give Val a copy of Albert’s hand-coloured photograph of my Mum, in the very same dress, that he took in 1937 – serendipitous to say the least.

I hope that you too like Val’s rendering of the photograph, and of course I encourage you to delve into the many fascinating works on her site. There is something hypnotic in the transformation of black and white images into ‘real’ colour – to me it’s as though the dream world of the past blooms and expands into life.

I see into my Mother’s childhood world, a world that of course I never knew. They are posing for my Grandmother, one spring afternoon, perhaps during the Easter weekend, at Headley House. There stands my Grandfather, standing tall, and by his standards informally dressed (as he is without a jacket). There sits my Great-Grandmother, in her habitual black and spotless white apron. My Great Aunt Frad beams at the camera, no doubt a cheeky quip on her lips. She lays a gentle hand upon my Mother’s arm, just to keep her still whilst the Brownie camera focuses and clicks. Then little Jeannie can go, go and find Blackie, go and play in the sunshine for a while, before she is called in to wash her hands for tea.

Church Parade

“We have got a cat here, a quite small one, ginger in colour. It is about the size of our Ginger”

Albert took this photo of ‘Ginger begging’ in 1937.

Albert writes his next letter on 30th November 1941, fresh from parading in front of a ‘herd of officers’, for no good reason that he could see. His mind is on Christmas presents and his afternoon out with a family friend. It’s just a little letter, but I love it for insights that it gives us, on everyday wartime life, and those family members that I never got a chance to meet. It pleases me to picture Albert sitting by the fire, his mind on the cosy details of home. I am sure that one of the ‘girls’ was in the background, making him a cup of cocoa to share with her, after he had finished writing.

Dear All, I am starting this in the morning after having been to church. After church we marched by a herd of officers,  moving at very nearly funeral pace,  while they stood in a row and saluted. I didn’t see much point in the show but I suppose it keeps someone happy.

Mr Gibson is coming this afternoon about 2, for a couple of hours, it is very good of him to come and visit me like this with petrol so scarce. I must remember to get him cigarettes for Christmas. I must also take uncle Vic some tobacco, if I manage to get there next week. I have been sending off letters and cards by the score, first saying that I was going to Castleton and then that I was not. I have already used that 2/6 book of stamps that you sent last week and shall have to buy or borrow an envelope for this letter.  I was out looking at shops yesterday afternoon and made one or two purchases. Regarding presents have you any ideas about something for Christine and Ron? I don’t think that there are any others I have forgotten. I could get an aeroplane construction kit for Ron. Would you like a calendar for 1942? I don’t suppose there will be many free ones this year and there are one or two in Boots which have taken my eye.

I was pleased to see the letter & statement from S.M.& B.P. The “ex gratis” payment made “4.4.0” was the fortnight’s advance pay which I got before leaving. The “War Allowance” is the 15% bonus. The “Provident Fund” is the superannuation affair. So if you work it out carefully you will see that next time the cheque should be for about £4. Continue to put it in the box taking out Jean’s money each week and I can put in the P.O. whatever is left when I come home. 

Saturday I got a letter from Jean which I shall enclose if I remember to do so. I should write to Peter in the week, though I have no idea of what I shall write about. Just before I forget it, I must tell you that I have my savings book and I believe the RAF money goes in every three months. I don’t think I know David Trim, but I used to know the Bickers boys. I believe Ken is the boy I know best. As for Phil,  I shouldn’t think he would be at all near the front.  You remember that they were well in the vanguard of the retreat from France, so I should think he will be well in the rearguard of the advance in Libya, I very much hope so.

Some of the fellows here have just been complaining that they do not like Sunday morning because there is nothing to do! I am only too pleased to have nothing to do, although I always have a letter on hand to start or finish.

Sunday Evening: I had quite a nice afternoon with Mr and Mrs Gibson.  He arrived at about 1.30 and we went to Fleetwood for the afternoon. He has a nice little car, a Morris 8, and it was very nice to have the afternoon with them. He had to leave early of course, to beat the blackout, and went at 4. I went out some way with him and walked back reaching the billet at 5. It was quite a fine afternoon, though there was a sharp NE wind blowing, which made it chilly to stand about. 

Fancy having some primroses out! I believe they were late last year too. I saw some violets for sale in one of the shops, and wondered if they have any out at Branstone. Auntie Daisy sent the other pair of socks during the week, and in her letter said that she had picked some raspberries which were quite nice. I wonder if you have had any other bottled fruit yet. (I am wearing the socks which are alright).

I had some unpleasant news today, a good many of the air-crew have been moved from this part of Blackpool, to where we started off and possibly we may go too. I sincerely hope not, and if I can I think I should lodge a complaint – though I don’t suppose it would do much good. We have got a cat here, a quite small one, ginger in colour. It is about the size of our Ginger, but of course the tail is different,  and it has more white in it. Yesterday he caught a mouse and was playing with it on the kitchen floor.  At our first billet there were scores of mice. I saw one running about in one of the cupboards in the scullery, where they sometimes kept with provisions, and that didn’t please me very much you can guess! I don’t think there is enough news for another sheet, so goodbye and love from Albert.

Ron was the son of my grandparents’ neighbours. He spent much of his childhood with my Mum and her brothers, joining them on holidays, and trips to the Island. We know him as ‘Uncle Ron’, always cheerful, always smiling. He made a career from his love of aeroplanes, working in the Concorde factory in Bristol. He was a dear friend to my Mother, almost like another brother to her.